How To Increase Hip Separation In the Downswing

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Jeremy Klinkhamer

23 Responses to “How To Increase Hip Separation In the Downswing”

  1. excellent Jeremy

  2. July 26, 2012

    JaySchwarz

    Does the ‘windshield wiper’ stretch also help develop disassociation?

    • Hi Jay,
      Typically the limitation would be spine flexibility or kinesthetic awareness. The ‘windshield wiper’ exercise will only improve dissociation If the limiting factor to a person’s dissociation is internal hip rotation. Here’s the the ‘windshield wiper’:
      http://www.fitgolf.com/wp-content/uploads/Exercises/Reeducate/windshieldwipers.pdf
      Jeremy Klinkhamer, PT

      • July 31, 2012

        JaySchwarz

        Jeremy, I was thinking of a different exercise. The one I was asking about is where you lay flat on your back, knees bent, feet flat on the floor, then rotate the knees all the way to the floor on one side and then the other side.

        • Hi Jay, thanks for the clarification. Yes, the exercise you just described definitely qualifies. Make sure to be strict with the upper back and arms and you’ll do just fine. Work on the standing exercise directly afterwards.
          Jeremy Klinkhamer, PT

  3. July 26, 2012

    barrybower

    not good at moving hips without some upper body movement as well, in doing this drill can you over do it or is the more reps the better.any idea how long it will take for this movement to get ingrained if the exercise is faithfully done.

    • Hi Barry,
      It’s impossible to guess when you’ll finally get the movement mastered. You really can’t over do it unless you’re getting pain or your exertion is too high. It is possible to get a sore lower back with this exercise if your pelvis is anteriorly tilted (belt buckle pointing down to the ground). If you feel this, try to lift your pelvis to neutral with your abdominal muscles so your belt buckle is pointing to the horizon. Keep it pointing to the horizon level as you rotate it left and right. Keep working on the ground first, then use the club for stability, then try without holding a club. Good luck.
      Jeremy Klinkhamer, PT

  4. Hi Jeremy, I can separate the lower from the upper as you show BUT can only turn either direction about 15 degrees. It appears to me that you have at least 30 degrees and probably more. How can I get that additional turn? I think I have better than average flexibility for a 74 year old everywhere except my hamstrings. Also, I am not as rhythmic or fluid in my motion as you are. Thanks for any suggestion to aid me.

    • Roy,
      Good question. My recommendation is to do the exercise I showed, in the same video, with the Swiss Ball under your legs. That exercise will increase your range of motion… remember to keep the arms and upper back flat on the ground while you work on rotating the ball back and forth slowly (with the intent of gaining rotational range). As far at the “fluid motion” it takes practice. I show this test/exercise almost every day at my performance center when I work with golfers. I’ve certainly gotten better over the years.
      Thanks for watching!
      Jeremy Klinkhamer, PT

  5. April 30, 2013

    ClintHead

    Hello Jeremy. Thanks for all the great drills. Taking your advice has greatly improved my game. I’ve just recently suffered a lat injury due to a dumb decision at work. It hurts to even swing a club. What is the best thing I can do to keep my game together while I recover?

    Thank you,
    Clint

    • April 30, 2013

      Paul Wilson

      Clint,

      Take Jeremy’s advice and take some time off to heal before you make it worse. Just chip and putt. If you do you will have a great short game by the time you are better. Once you are a little better just do easy practice swings at home working on my swing positions. Injuries can be great for working on the swing in the sense that you can’t keep whacking golf balls hard.

  6. Sorry to hear about the accident, Clint. I wish I could help but I think you really need to see a physical therapist in your area. Even if the therapist isn’t “golf-specific” you need to be evaluated properly. You shouldn’t play with pain. Pain is an indicator that what you’re doing should be stopped. So, my advice is to stop swinging, see a proper medical professional in your immediate area and get your injury taken care of properly before you return. The chance of injuring yourself worse is too high if you don’t.
    Jeremy Klinkhamer, PT

  7. Jeremy , I practise the SWISS BALL exercise a bit differently from you ,which makes it easier:THE two legs are draped over THE ball at 10 0’clock and 2 o’clock .THE goal is to contact THE ground with THE outside of each knee .
    I have a simpler one ,which I find more effective :lying on back ,two legs extended (N

  8. December 11, 2014

    BillFreeman

    Great tip. Really helpful. I have struggled with this for years and never knew the technical name for it. Also never had exercises to develop the disassociation. New I turned “like a gate” but have a hard time changing that. Thanks,

    Bill

  9. December 11, 2014

    LenKoblenz

    Very interesting tip. I think it will take awhile to get the flexibility you have. BTW, do you moonlight as a Hula dancer? Looks like you could. 🙂

    Len

  10. Hi Jeremy
    I am struggling to get this lower body disassociation. I can’t get with the club also. So I am trying with Swiss Ball. With it can rotate my hips without moving my upper body from waist upwards. But I still can do the standing exercise immediately afterwards.

    How many rotations should I do each time?
    How many days it will take for me to get the hips rotation properly standing upright.

    Thanks

    • Hi Venu,
      This one is tough for a number of people. As for the rotations with your legs on the ball… do 10-20 full rotations. You can also take the ball out but keep your legs in the same exact position and do the same exercise… you may not be able to do as many as this is a strength exercise without the ball present but you can get there with a bit of hard work. Your last question on a timeline to successful pelvic dissociation is impossible to answer… some people get it right away and others don’t.

      Try this tip: When trying lower body (or pelvic) dissociation without holding on to anything… think about “grinding and twisting” your feet into the ground like you would in a sand bunker. This horizontal friction between your shoes and the ground is the missing piece to rotation for most of my golfer’s having a difficult time with this one. Your feet won’t actually move, but the energy from the friction to the ground should make it’s way up to your hips… put your arms out to the side for a bit of stability.

      Let me know how that goes,
      Jeremy Klinkhamer, PT

  11. Hi Jeremy
    After few days of exercise with swiss ball and following your tip now I am able to move my lower body without moving upper body as shown in your tip. However I am still not able to apply this to my golf swing properly. I mean still during the swing hips are not moving ahead of the club.

    Any ideas how to take it the swing.

    Regards

    Venu

  12. February 27, 2016

    Raoul Bintner

    Hi Jeremy,
    Excellent tip. I showed the Swiss ball exercise to my coach at the gym and we added it to my fitness program. Also tried a variation by adding a medicine ball between the knees to increase the difficulty… Thanks.
    Raoul

    • Thanks Raoul,
      I like your idea of increasing the difficulty. If you put a medicine ball between the knees, like you said, you can also get rid of the physioball completely. Just move like it’s still there so your legs maintain the same proper position. Even more advanced is to put something between your feet and have your legs completely vertical (90 degree hips but straight knees)! You may not be able to rotate as much side to side but it’s a great challenge (you may have to work on hamstring flexibility though).
      Jeremy Klinkhamer, PT

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