Separate Your Practice Balls

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Paul Wilson

Paul Wilson is the creator of Swing Machine Golf and founder of Ignition Golf. Paul's golf swing technique is based on the Iron Byron swing machine. YouTube Channels: Paul Wilson Golf and Ignition Golf Tips. Please Join me on Google+

8 Responses to “Separate Your Practice Balls”

  1. August 3, 2017

    IanCaroline

    Paul
    Different subject-I would be interested to know whether you are now using the one length ( 7 iron) for all your irons . As I recall you were considering it.

    • Paul Wilson

      August 4, 2017

      Paul Wilson

      Ian,

      I switched to the cobra one forged because I liked the look better. Unfortunately, I hit them poorly (could be the shafts) so I went back to my Taylor’s to see the difference. I’ve had shoulder pain so I haven’t played for a month. Once I get back into it I want to compare the taylor’s to the original Sterling Single Length irons I was using. So I haven’t given up on them. I hit the Sterlings great. I just want to see what I hit better.

  2. Good morning Paul,

    While I find this routine interesting, I question the information I am receiving at the practice tee.
    I find that if I purchase a bucket of 70 balls and hit from 10 to 15 balls to determine which club is travelling 150 yds. consistently, I can then move on to practicing a round.
    This round is determined by a score card of any course I have played. Thus I may hit a driver or 3 wood off the tee followed by whatever club is appropriate for my next shot until I am on the green. This routine is followed through 9 holes to include pars 3, 4 and 5. The remaining balls are usually utilized in practicing the short game.
    In my opinion, playing the different clubs to simulate a round is more effective as you will never, almost, see the same shot twice on one hole.
    Am I correct in my routine or do I need to adopt a more structured routine as you suggest?

    I look forward to your learned response,
    -Rich P

    • Paul Wilson

      August 4, 2017

      Paul Wilson

      Richard,

      I am suggesting you use the bulk of your balls to practice your swing and swing positions. You cannot do this playing different holes. You need to focus on perfect movement and keep developing a great swing. At you level I know you need to keep perfecting it.

      If you want to do this before you play that’s fine but concentrated practice is what is needed. So you set up a practice station with an alignment stick. Separate the balls for driver and longer clubs as I suggest.

      You do 3 practice swing working on a position or 2. You do them slowly and precisely. You remember the feeling of the position. Tee your ball up. Then try to replicate this exact feeling with a ball in front of you. You can take note of the ball but really it doesn’t matter about the ball until you have worked on all positions and you are putting them together. As you put the positions together you develop a great swing. A great swing hits great shots.

      To refresh your memory, here are the lessons I teach:

      http://ignitiongolf.com/start-here/

      Also:

      Working On Your Swing Is Work: http://ignitiongolf.com/change-takes-work/

  3. August 4, 2017

    BurtFord

    Paul
    Could you tell me how many balls you might hit for each club for a practice session ? It is hard to tell from the picture. We have a machine and it can dispense a small bucket (25+/-)or a large bucket (75 +/-) at our club.
    Thanks Burt

    • Paul Wilson

      August 4, 2017

      Paul Wilson

      Burt,

      With 75 balls you would warm up with 10-20 balls. You would hit 40-50 6-7 iron and the remaining balls you would hit with longer clubs. If you are on a roll you would keep going with 6-7 iron. Into the next bucket you would then move to driver.

      1 large bucket should take you at least 45 mins to hit.

      Watch tonight’s tip to understand how and why.

      Also,

      Working On Your Swing Is Work: http://ignitiongolf.com/change-takes-work/

  4. JohnBenson

    August 23, 2017

    JohnBenson

    Well I like where this practice swing takes me!
    3 practice swings with a couple of “say yes” involved in each, it makes a much better practice time on the range. And the best part is the mind relaxation where I don’t care where the ball goes.
    Plus the extra benefit is a beautiful golf shot can happen without hitting hard like I used to!

    • Paul Wilson

      August 23, 2017

      Paul Wilson

      John,

      Very good. No sense wasting time at the range. Clear precise practice will shave years off of your learning.

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