Exercise To Increase Your Shoulder Turn


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Jeremy Klinkhamer

7 Responses to “Exercise To Increase Your Shoulder Turn”

  1. October 23, 2013

    TIMADAMS

    Jeremy should we consider this a pre golf stretch(like before hitting balls at the range),or should this be added to our exercise program

    • Hi Tim,
      To be honest, the best time to use it is when you feel you need it. In other words, if you’re stretching to get ready for a round of golf and you feel like your shoulder turn is restricted, for whatever reason, try this technique to see if you can get your rotation to “free up”. So I don’t use the technique every time I stretch, just when I feel I’m especially tight and it’s not loosening up like I feel it should.
      Thanks for the question. I hope that clarifies it for you.
      Jeremy Klinkhamer, PT

  2. October 25, 2013

    RaymondCHASTEL

    A very “intelligent”exercise ,JEREMY ,thank you for demonstrating it !
    I’ll try it immediately
    I usually practice my spine rotation lying on my back (I believe you showed us this exercise some time ago ),turning over with one leg flexed 90 degrees at the knee over the other one ,which is staying still straight on the floor ,and holding for 15 seconds that position .Sometimes I even add weights on the flexed leg to force the flexed leg down more !

  3. Not infrequently I get a muscle spasm when I do these. These muscle spasms are not new for me . Should I expect that these will stop with more frequent practice of these stretches?

    • Hey Francis,
      Some people are very prone to cramping/spasms during contraction of a muscle. Calf and hamstrings cramp a lot at night because of our “fetal” positioning plus tiny movements and contractions we make during deep sleep… the next thing you know you’re in major pain. This may be familiar since this sort of things isn’t ‘new for you’ as you mentioned above. One thing you can try to do is limit how long you hold a contracted position. In this exercise you’re asked to hold the rotation as you side bend. This may not work for you. Try side bending multiple times each way while seated – no rotation, just sidebend 5-10 times each direction without holding the side bent position – stay continuously in motion. Then once you’ve done that, rotate while seated but again, don’t hold it. Stay moving. Do this cycle a few times to see if you can improve your turn without causing all sorts of other problems associated with the original exercise in the video. One other big tip is to make sure you’re hydrated and warmed-up before you start exercises… for someone that is prone to cramping you need to be more diligent than most. Hope this helps.
      Jeremy Klinkhamer, PT

  4. JohnBenson

    June 12, 2017

    JohnBenson

    I’m pretty flexible overall but this just feels good doing it. A nice stretch, thanks for the tip!

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