Opposite Series – Pull Club Down or Let Club Fall

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Paul Wilson

Paul Wilson is the creator of Swing Machine Golf and founder of Ignition Golf. Paul's golf swing technique is based on the Iron Byron swing machine. YouTube Channels: Paul Wilson Golf and Ignition Golf Tips. Please Join me on Google+

8 Responses to “Opposite Series – Pull Club Down or Let Club Fall”

  1. October 18, 2015

    Stanleycarney

    My shoulder seam to sometimes hyperextend with centrifical force if I don’t keep my back

    rotator cuff muscles flexed is this ok

    • October 21, 2015

      Paul Wilson

      Stanley,

      Not sure on this one. This is the first I have every heard of it. This would be a personal issue. Not sure why this would be hurting as you are not hitting anything but if you have to do this to stop any pain then you may want to keep doing it. Just make sure you are not tightening your wrists. You need them loose to get the whipping action of the club.

  2. October 19, 2015

    GerryCarriere

    Hi Paul. What about lag? There seems to be a fine line between lag and pulling. I am not using my arms but lately, I have been thinking about lag in my down swing. I noticed that you did not mention lag in this tip. Maybe I have been thinking too much about lag in my downswing and instead, I may be pulling my club down. About 2 months ago I started thinking of lag in my downswing with great results but lately
    I have encountered directional problems. I wonder if this is the cause. Your thoughts please.

  3. October 19, 2015

    daviddonaldson

    My question is much the same as Gerry above. I’ve been working on your lag tips where there seems to be a definite feeling of the club dropping down to maintain the wrist hinge until you reach the back leg. There is then the whipping release of the club providing the power.
    It seems a little tricky to concentrate on maintaining the wrist angle and also on firing your lower body first or maybe I’m over thinking this.
    Every evening I’m out in the yard practicing the lag drill but presumably must not forget to turn the lower body also.
    Your tips, by the way, have made me a much more consistent player with a much better and easy fluid swing.

  4. October 19, 2015

    RaymondCHASTEL

    Paul ,Your method is excellent :I played 18 holes this morning ,concntraing on “POWERLESS ARMS ” and TURN YOUR BELLY BUTTON FIRST “.
    It worked perfectly without any effort .
    Question :in the swing ,would you say that the club is going from “steep “(in the backswing ) to “shallow “in the downswing ,and it’s better to have a steep backswing than a flat one

    • October 21, 2015

      Paul Wilson

      Raymond,

      Most of the best swings of all time were 2 plane. You go up then fire the body and the plane flattens in the downswing. I do not like flat or one plane swings. Flat was Hogan but he was the exception. Nicklaus (2 plane) Tiger 2001-2003 (2 plane) and the list goes on. With a 2 plane you get power and consistency if done right. All long drivers are 2 plane not that you are going to be a long driver but if a flat swing hit it farther they would all be doing it. I have yet to see one doing a flat golf or one plane golf swing.

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