Meltdown at the 12th

By | on April 14, 2016 | 10 Comments | FavoriteLoadingAdd to favorites (see below)


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Paul Wilson

Paul Wilson is the creator of Swing Machine Golf and founder of Ignition Golf. Paul's golf swing technique is based on the Iron Byron swing machine. YouTube Channels: Paul Wilson Golf and Ignition Golf Tips. Please Join me on Google+

10 Responses to “Meltdown at the 12th”

  1. April 15, 2016

    BruceBerg

    That was a great review of his faults on 12 and a great way to correct the errors when it happens to us. I really like “feel the heel” to remind me to continue the swing with the goal of touching my knees at the finish of the swing. Awesome review and lesson.

  2. April 15, 2016

    douglasmaiko

    good points, but i feel with jordon it was 90% caused by the extreme stress of playing at the masters. if you look at low scores posted in majors by winners in the final round, its usually players coming from behind who have low expectaions of winning. I can not remembe a leader in the final round of a major posting a super low score. pressure kills your mechanics

  3. Good stuff highlighting the flaws of Jordan Spieth. I think he comes out of it a bit early normally. He had a few pushed drives into the trees on the right also which he got away with.

    On the other hand a few great players have come up a bit early with no great problems e.g. Annika Sorenstam,David Duval and presently Henrik Stenson.

    It is,however, an excellent example of helping the ordinary mortal recognise the cause of a fault and how to rectify it.
    Keep up the great work!!

    • April 15, 2016

      Paul Wilson

      David,

      Yes, he hit is everywhere. It’s amazing he doesn’t shoot 85 some times.

      Glad you liked the tips.

  4. April 15, 2016

    WilliamHeuer

    I really enjoy your lessons and feel I am getting better step by step. One area I keep having a big problem with is that many of the greens on our course are elevated. When I have a 30 to 50 yard pitch shot I end up doing what you mentioned in today’s lesson. I am right handed and can not get on my left side. I do try to level my shoulders. I use a SW and when I do hit it clean it goes about half way to the hole. You can guess the other things that happen….fat shot or blade over the green. How should I hit this pitch shot on an up hill lie?

    • April 15, 2016

      Paul Wilson

      Bill,

      If you are uphill you need to take more club or add distance to the shot you’re trying to hit. So you have a 40 yarder severely uphill you need to play for 60 yards. The uphill is adding loft onto your club so you think you are hitting a sand wedge when really you are hitting a lob wedge.

      On this shots you are still turning your hips to hit the shot. Even if you can’t get to the left side the turning of the hips is turning your body which is the whole point. Your arms are connected to your body so they will move when you turn.

      So understanding you are going to add loft why not just take gap wedge? A gap would be a SW from a severe uphill lie.

      Here are the different shots. Although not about pitching they would apply:

      Uphill: http://ignitiongolf.com/uphill-lies/

      Downhill: http://ignitiongolf.com/shot-downhill-lie/

      Ball Below Feet: http://ignitiongolf.com/shot-ball-below-feet/

      Ball Above Feet: http://ignitiongolf.com/ball-above-your-feet/

  5. April 15, 2016

    LenKoblenz

    I am a CPA taking a break to watch a tip or two. I have been getting ready to start playing again and I am thoroughly convinced that your method(s) will send my handicap plummeting. Confidence is THE key. Following your instruction should breed confidence. One doesn’t have to ‘hit’ the ball. One just has to relax, learn the fundamentals (grip, setup, etc.) and get to the positions that your tips teach us. One never has to worry about the ball. If one is not worrying about the ball, one will not look up too soon. For the first time in my life, I feel like I really know what to do. It is so exhilarating. Thanks again for all that you do.

    Len

    • April 17, 2016

      Paul Wilson

      Len,

      You are right. You just have to follow it which I know you will. That’s when the fun begins.

      Glad you are doing well. Keep up the good work.

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