The Halfway Back Position Effects the Top of the Backswing

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Paul Wilson

Paul Wilson is the creator of Swing Machine Golf and founder of Ignition Golf. Paul's golf swing technique is based on the Iron Byron swing machine. YouTube Channels: Paul Wilson Golf and Ignition Golf Tips. Please Join me on Google+

6 Responses to “The Halfway Back Position Effects the Top of the Backswing”

  1. March 29, 2014

    Tom

    Thanks Paul, another critical position, I had forgotten his move, now getting lovely contact sound and powerless arms feeling. I think this a critical move for me going back to stop hitting with arms. Thanks again!

    • March 30, 2014

      Paul Wilson

      Tom,

      Very good. All positions are important. We should all be working on them a little long into the future so they don’t fall apart. Glad you are doing well.

  2. November 29, 2016

    WillCooper

    Hi, Paul. I am posting this comment here because commenting on the full swing has been temporarily closed. Pete critiqued a video of my swing a few days ago, and one of the points he made was that I was hingeing too soon in the backswing. Not dramatically, but enough so that it could open up the club face leading to either a push fade or if I tried to use my hands to correct, a pull. What I want to comment on is the effort it takes to get into the right position at the top of the backswing. What I have found is that this is actually physically demanding, a fact that is not emphasized in your tips. At the school, I mentioned to you that in keeping the knee of my back leg facing forward, not allowing my hips to turn any more than about 23°, making sure my spine angle stays the same, and keeping my left leg from straightening requires a significant effort. The coil is quite tight and requires a lot of abdominal strength; it’s not comfortable, which is why so many of us never learn it properly. I worked with Jeremy on it yesterday for an hour. It was exhausting. No doubt it will get easier, but this is a point I think people need to know. Coiling properly requires real effort. The tension you feel at the top of the backswing requires resistance in the back leg and from the abdominal muscles to prevent over-rotation. Whew! But when I let it loose, I feel the power. But it comes at a price I was never aware of.

    • Paul Wilson

      November 30, 2016

      Paul Wilson

      Will,

      I actually talk a lot about this tight wound up feeling whenever I am talking about coiling. I say it is hard to breath if you are holding it for any period of time at the top. The tightness is felt int he left lat area. This tightness is not to be avoided but used. This tightness says you have torque and torque repeats 100% of the time in life.

      Pros Know Its A Tight Coil: http://ignitiongolf.com/pros-know-tight-coil/
      Coiling: http://ignitiongolf.com/learn-coil-backswing/

      Now, don’t hurt yourself. It is a tight feeling because you are coiling the amount you can coil. Just get the ratio between the shoulders, hips, knees and feet and you will be fine. Keep in mind you are not holding it at the top for more than a few milliseconds so this does not hurt.

  3. November 30, 2016

    WillCooper

    Hi, Paul. The feeling of tightness in the left lat area is quite prominent when I extend my arms properly in the takeaway and also keep my hips and legs in the right positions. My abs come noticeably into play, as well as my right quads in order to keep my weight on the right instep. When I see your swing or Ernie Els’ or Fred Couples, the backswing doesn’t look nearly as athletic as it actually is. I guess that was the point of my comment. It looks deceptively easy.. What I’ve learned is that it takes exertion to put myself into the correct position at the top of the backswing with my shoulders turned to 90 degrees and keeping my hips and knees held firmly in the right ratios. In the past I always either over-rotated my hips or else let my right knee away turn away from the target, thus sacrificing the tension in my coil. Put another way, I had no coil! I am willing to bet that my experience matches that of a lot of amateurs. As you kept pointing out, it’s human nature not to cause oneself any discomfort, and performing the backswing in the correct manner requires effort and momentary discomfort at the top. But it’s creating an enormous improvement in my power and consistency. Once again, you’re the best, hombre.

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