What To Expect Series – Increasing Leg Drive

By | on June 21, 2015 | 6 Comments | FavoriteLoadingAdd to favorites (see below)


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Paul Wilson

Paul Wilson is the creator of Swing Machine Golf and founder of Ignition Golf. Paul's golf swing technique is based on the Iron Byron swing machine. YouTube Channels: Paul Wilson Golf and Ignition Golf Tips. Please Join me on Google+

6 Responses to “What To Expect Series – Increasing Leg Drive”

  1. June 22, 2015

    Roy

    Paul,

    In working on my lower body trigger, I found that lifting my left heel slightly on my back swing gives me a better feeling of my trigger on the down swing. I use the straighten the knee trigger. Does this cause a problem to ingrain that move? It just seems like I get to my left side better.

    Roy

  2. June 22, 2015

    TIMADAMS

    Paul, What’s your opinion on,at address having the feeling of your feet really dug into the ground and your weight 60%/40% (LF/RF) then push off with L to achieve weight shift 100% on on R Leg

    • Tim,

      You should be 50/50 at address with the weight evenly distributed. Not sure why you would ever want more weight on the left than on the right. Would you do this in other sports? I think you need to do the helicopter drill a few times. As you coil the shoulders you will see your head move and the weight load. Your job is to feel it load onto the instep at the top. Most people turn the hips too much and roll to the outside of the back foot. If so you have not torque and will not use the lower body to start the downswing.

      DRILL: Helicopter: http://ignitiongolf.com/important-warm-drill

      Turn Back on the Right Angle: http://ignitiongolf.com/backswing-helicopter-blades/

  3. Paul,

    I’m having an issue maintaining loose wrists and yet a firm grip. Unlike Iron Byron, the human wrist is not anatomically independent of the hand grip. The grip strength is controlled by muscles mostly in the forearm and it is connected to the hands by tendons that run along the wrist. As these tendons tighten, the wrist has to become stiffer. Tighter grips decrease wrist range of movement and increase tension in the wrist.

    If I loosen my wrists my grip naturally loosens too. So how tight are your wrists through impact? I can only get powerless arms with a real loose grip which lets the club flow around.

    Ideas?

    Paul

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