DRILL: A Slow Backswing Gives You More Time To Check

By | on July 11, 2014 | 15 Comments | FavoriteLoadingAdd to favorites (see below)


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Paul Wilson

Paul Wilson is the creator of Swing Machine Golf and founder of Ignition Golf. Paul's golf swing technique is based on the Iron Byron swing machine. YouTube Channels: Paul Wilson Golf and Ignition Golf Tips. Please Join me on Google+

15 Responses to “DRILL: A Slow Backswing Gives You More Time To Check”

  1. July 12, 2014

    AmmarAhmad

    Good tip Paul. Does the lead arm have to be dead straight at the top of back swing?

  2. July 12, 2014

    johnhoyle

    Greetings Coach Thanks

  3. July 12, 2014

    LouisBond

    I have noriced when I get out of my tempo I hit bad shots. Slowing up my back swing seems to help my tendency to over swing & it helps my timing.

    Question is does timing make a big difference in the ability to hit the ball first?

  4. MichelAuger

    July 13, 2014

    Mike

    I have slowed down my backswing and gained considerable distance. The improvement seems to come from accelarating throught the downswing once I feel I had the “timing” right (a speedy backswing keeps me from getting good timing). Thanks Coach !

    Mike

    • Mike,

      Very good. I love hearing this. A slower backswing allows you to load and get ready to come down. Keep this new slower backswing pace now forever.

  5. Paul ,
    I tried this morning on the 18 holes of m’y home club a différent way to ” load “the backswing .
    It’s one you don’t like !
    It’s the first of the 4,MAGIC MOVES TO WINNING GOLF ” of late teacher JOE DANTE .
    You set the hinging of the club immediately at the beginning of the backswing by pressing the right hand thumb pad on the left thumb .all you have to do then is to COIL to,the top .
    It brought a very big improvement to the quality of the ball striking ,criso and précise off the clubface ,with increased distance ,
    It worked the best with the FAIRWAY Woods ,nô more thinning or Topping thèse shots off the turf or the short rough !
    Probably with the ” conventional ” way there’s something I do wrong!
    Any comments ?

  6. Thanks for the message of caution .Following your advice ,i’ll stop this ” dangerous “expérimentation .
    Is there an optimal angle for the position of the right forearm and the clubshaft at the top of the swing ( more than 90° ,90°,less than 90°)?
    The smaller the angle ,the more you CAN lag !
    So ,do you have to work on the flexibility of the wrists?
    When you look at JAMIE SADLOWSKI ,HE’s tremendously flexible ( So is past glory JOHN DALY !)
    Is there a way to work to keep That closed angle ( Clubshaft/ Right forearm )the longes t possible in the downswing?

    • Raymond

      Why experiment? You have improved with my method. Now, make it perfect.

      No exact angle on this arm. I never even think about it. Iron Byron doesn’t have a right arm until after the ball is hit. Around 90 degrees or less would be fine.

      Do this drill constantly:

      DRILL: Lag Ear to Ear: http://ignitiongolf.com/lag-release-drill

  7. July 24, 2014

    JimArnold

    Paul,

    This tip seems to have tied everything together for me. My nature is to talk and walk fast. I’ve instinctually known my backswing was too fast. There have been times when I focused on slowing my backswing speed and noted how much better I struck the ball.

    This video, like others I’ve watched on the site, gives me the affirmation that I was on the right track, because it’s so easy to abandon a correct path when you’re acting as you own coach.

    After watching this tip I determined I would focus on making my backswing as slow as possible. In my mind I was picturing Ryan Moore’s swing. I was already working on wrist cock, full backswing and making certain I finished the swing with the club touching the back of my head and parallel to my eyes.

    I play in two nine-hole leagues. The first outing at the harder of the 2 courses I shot +3. Next round at the easier course was +2. This past week I shot a +4 and shot an even par round last night. For this round I had in my mind a recent video tip where you talked about how hard you are driving your legs in hips, even if it does not look that way on video.

    A few months ago I was trying to swing “easy.” My 7 iron was going 130 yards. :(
    Like Mike above, it seems that swinging slow going back creates the time for me to properly use my hips and legs to start the downswing.

    Having shot +9 for 36 holes is not due to the slow backswing alone. For the past few months I’ve been working on your pitching technique. With my gap wedge at 90 yards, for instance, I’m now disappointed if I’m not with 10 feet. Starting last year I incorporated your numbered chipping system. It’s brilliant because it’s so simple! I’m saving par far more often now. I didn’t take up golf until my early 30′s and I’m always amazed at how poorly guys who have been playing for 30 years or more chip and pitch wasting strokes every round. If they knew your system they’d be saving par more often too.

    For those of us who walk and talk fast, any tips on maintaing that sloooooow backswing?

    • Jim,

      Great summary of your progress. This is huge. It really seems like this was the missing link. I deal with a lot of people who are fast in life. It is tough to slow them down but vital. The faster people go back the tighter they get. So as you keep doing this in the future not only get the legs ready to go but focus on not tightening your arms.

      I love the fact you are also working on your short game. This can definitely save a lot of shots and it isn’t even hard to do.

      Keep up the good work.

  8. August 6, 2014

    paulelliott

    Paul.
    What are your views on a slight pause at top of backswing before commencing downswing?

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